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20121205
20121213
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a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it out over a number of months. and that that really erodes confidence. >> reporter: against that backdrop, the federal reserve is trying to do all it can to help the economy. the central bank is widely expected to announce an extension of its bond buying program when it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would contin
republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a finan
cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans proposed raising $800 billion in extra revenues. and that revenue should come through tax reform and closing loopholes. happy new year. question, patrick, looking into the crystal ba
slow- walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: behind the scenes, progress is being made, but democrats are still arguing they've given ground in previous budget battles. that's one reason they are holding firm on higher taxes now. >> $1.6 trillion in cuts. "where are the cuts?" they are in bills that you, mr. speaker, have voted for. >> reporter: and there were new calls for more tax revenue today. warren buffett, vanguard founder john bogle, and financier george soros were among the famous names to call for a tougher estate tax. their proposal would exempt couples with up to $4 million in assets from the estate tax. above that level, estates would pay a 45% tax rate, rising to 50% or more on very large estates. supporters say that would both bring in badly needed revenue and help protect our democracy. >> it works to reduce concentrations of economic and political power across generations, and those concentrations are antithetical to the basic premise, if you will, of the founding of our republic, which was that it was a land of opport
that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow-walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> sreenivasan: the president has insisted there will be no deal unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the top 2%. republicans say the tax hikes would only hurt job creation. but in arlington, virginia, vice president biden said today's jobs report shows the economy is turning a corner, so it's critical to get a deal. >> there is a sense... there is a sense that if we can reach an- - act like adults and reach an agreement here on the fiscal cliff, the upside is much higher even than the downside is if we don't. >> sreenivasan: biden said the president is willing to consider what he called any serious offer. aides for the two sides were expected to continue talking, through the weekend. wall street was mostly higher on the news from november's jobs report. the dow jones industrial average gained 81 points to close at 13,155. the nasdaq was hurt by another sell-off in apple stock, and fell 11 points to close at 2,978. for the week, the dow gained 1%. the nasdaq lost 1%. this
the administration absolutely it prepared to let the economy go over the fiscal cliff unless the republicans accept higher tax rates on the healthy. and the southern philippines struggled to recover from a typhoon that killed nearly 300 people. and what does a day in the life of public buses, trains and subways look like? the answer is part of our science roundup online. hari sreenivasan has the details. >> sreenivasan: the image resembles a lite-bright time lapse. find those pictures and our conversation with a software developer who set out to visualize the 24-hour cycle of urban public transit systems. that's on our homepage. an international telecommunications conference in dubai aims to set new rules for the internet. what's at stake? we take a look in the rundown. and on making sense, economics correspondent paul solman argues both sides of the capital gains tax debate. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. judy? >> woodruff: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. thank you a
't be happy about it. >> reporter: as lawmakers rush to rescue the economy from the fiscal cliff emergency, they have focused -- as have we thus far -- on itemized deductions. but when it comes to tax breaks or preferences, says robert... >> not just deductions. it includes things like exclusion from income, the biggest one of which is the we don't tax you on the premiums your employer pays for the health insurance we get. much bigger than anything on the deduction side. it's not the only exclusion we have. the exclusion of all the contributions to the retirement plans, your 401(k), your irks r.a., also very, very large. >> reporter: we're not going to start counting as income the money that our employer puts in for our medical insurance, are we? or for that matter, we're not going to get rid of the exclusion for putting money into a 401(k) to deaver taxation but encourage us to save more. >> it's pretty unlikely we'll count all of that income. we're already scheduled to count some of the premiums paid your employers. in 2018 the obama care will start taxing the very highest premiums, the
the country, i think this whole issue around taxes and around the fiscal cliff generally leads to something else, which is significant uncertainty. and whether it is delaware or whether it is any other state, one of the things that is most important to us is having business leaders have some kind of certainty about what the ground rules are going to be. not just for the next three months, by the way. but really for the next several years. they're more likely to invest, more likely to hire their next employee if they know what the game looks like. what the landscape looks like. and so as much as anything else, we think having that certainty, having that clarity on taxes and spending, is really important. >> susie: you said you are also very concerned about where growth is going to come from. did you discuss that with the president, won did he say, aside from tax increases and spending cuts? >> one of the things we specifically talked about was infrastructure. it didn't used to be that roads and bridges were democrat or republican. we need to continue to invest in our infrastructure, a strong
cuts? the longer the white house slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. now, if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> on that question of whether or not we have put forward specific spending cuts, the answer is is we have. not only that, we signed law a trillion dollars in specific spending cuts. so if you combine what is signed into law with what we proposed versus the total absence of any specificity from the republicans for a single dollar in revenue, i think in the battle of specificity, the outcome has already been decided. >> woodruff: and a short time ago an administration official told us the president and the speaker spoke by phone this evening. now to our series of conversations on this subject and what should be done. we've listened to a range of opinions in recent days, including erskine bowles of the simpson
be a mistake to go over the fiscal cliff because it could set in motion lots of things that could be a drag on the economy. that being said, i think if it's clear that the parties were working toward a negotiation, that you could spill into january without doing any irreversible damage. >> one of the ideas that seems to now be on the table is this idea of moving to a more accurate measure of inflation and using that to adjust social security benefits and tax brackets. is that something you could support in. >> well, i have two concerns with that. one is the general issue about dealing with social security in the context of these deficit reduction talks. because social security is fully solvent until the year 2033. after that point it would pay 75 cents on the dollar. if you do nothing. so we should work to deal with the long-term full solvency issue of social security. and the sooner we do that, the better. but it should be dealt with on its own terms. >> second, the chain cpi has a very negative impact on seniors, especially as they get older and older, because of its compounding effect. a
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10